Link Building

Good Links, Bad Links, You know I’ve had my Share…

With the Pandas and Penguins running amok… everyone is now going backwards like crazy, going backwards with respect to trying to have their links removed from other sites.

Reciprocal links, begging for links via E-mail, the sneaky “3-way” – we all know about those “tactics”. Now people are asking, pleading and begging for their links to be removed! Another *omg-the-algorithm-has-been-updated-knee-jerk-reaction* – we even have the Disavow tool which some think may harm your site rather than do what you’re wanting the tool to do! I’ve even seen companies that claim they’ll remove links from sites that you (or the company) deem undesirable. We’ve gone a full 180! Didn’t we used to pay companies to add/find (mostly bogus) sites that our link would go on????

I sometimes think the people at Google are sitting back and laughing when they make one of their announcements *do this, do that, no do this… wait that might be bad*. They lead SEO’s around by their ear and make us jump through hoops. I’ve thought for years Google didn’t like “us types” but it depends on who you believe. I have my own thoughts on that but we’re sticking with links for now.

Bad, Bad Links!

When you read about links, the acquisition and quality of, you’d typically think that an unnatural link as a “bad” link. Ok, that makes sense… In my opinion if you’re going out of your way in order to help boost your sites in the search engines, it’s probably not a good practice. Before the PR tool was released, you’d naturally link to a page because it was related to your site content and you were providing your users with additional information. For instance, if I had a site about Siamese cats, I might link to other Siamese cat sites naturally. I wouldn’t ask for a link back as I just wanted to supplement the information I had already provided on my site, just another resource related to my existing topic… Again, since the PR tool was rolled out, it just became mad-crazy with people asking for links, asking for reciprocal linking, 3-way linking, etc. When something gets out of hand with SEO practices Google steps in and deems what’s *good and bad*. That’s when updates like Panda and Penguin starts happening. That’s when people start scrambling around before the dust settles. Ah Google… it’s their sandbox so we play by their rules.

What makes a link bad?

Depends on who you talk to. Links from unrelated sites, links from pages with no related content, links from pages full of unrelated links, link farms. Those would be your top culprits.

I read this today:
Why Do You Want Your Link Removed? – which is a great article. I found this part especially interesting:

Some of the characteristics of links we are trying to get rid of MAY include:

-Links from websites with no contact information.
-Links from websites with no privacy policies.
-Links in content that has been duplicated elsewhere.
-Links with artificial or pointless anchor text that really shouldn’t be there.
-Links from pages that may no longer be indexed by Google.
-Links from websites that we believe may themselves be penalized by Google
-Links from pages that are strictly “sales oriented” and serve no other purpose
-Links that exist merely due to a financial arrangement of any sort.
-Links from websites and pages that may be considered to have “thin content”.
-Links from sites/pages with unnaturally low or no inbound links of their own.
-Links from sites/pages with an unnaturally high number of inbound links.
-Links from sites/pages that are using suspicious “on page” SEO tactics.

I’ve never really been a link builder or explored that avenue. I can’t see sitting all day and acquiring one link for a days work. They’re are people that are masters at this area of Internet Marketing (better them than me!) – let the bullfighter fight the bull!

Twitter LinkedIn Facebook Pinterest
Facebook Like Us!
Twitter Feed